: Describe the characteristics and concerns of a selected immigrant or refugee population.

Posted: March 17th, 2022

ADVOCACY FOR IMMIGRANT AND REFUGEE CLIENTS: PROMOTING ACTION IN YOUR ORGANIZATION Assignment Scope Create a PowerPoint presentation and compose speaker notes in the notes section or in a separate Word document that succinctly conveys the challenges faced by an immigrant or refugee population as well as the counselor’s and organization’s roles in helping individuals and families meet and overcome these challenges. You may choose a population that was presented in your textbook or one that has relevance to your own life or professional experience. Your PowerPoint should also provide some information regarding strategies and resources for working with an immigrant or refugee population. For the challenges faced by your chosen population, you may select from content from your textbook, outside literature, or personal experiences. Assignment Instructions In your presentation, make sure you address the following: Describe the characteristics and concerns of a selected immigrant or refugee population. Identify roles and strategies for a counselor to adopt that could help address the challenges for immigrant families related to acculturation. Explain the challenges and barriers for a selected population with regards to optimal development, mental health, and help seeking. Present the counseling practice implications that are key for team members to effectively assess and work with individuals and families from a selected population. Advocate for resources or programming the agency needs to increase the accessibility of services and more effectively serve the population. Communicate a presentation in a manner that effectively informs the audience about culturally alert practices, is appealing visually, as well as is persuasive and respectful in its message. The Week 9 – Advocacy Presentation Sample Template [PPTX] provides you with an example structure for this assignment. The template does not have a design attached to it and you will need to select a design and make your presentation not only professional but also visually appealing. The template also provides some guidance, or ideas, about what you might want to include in each section in order to successfully address all of the scoring guide criteria for the assignment. The following site has some great templates to help you design your presentation. Slidesgo. For more information on how to use PowerPoint, see the Microsoft link below. Microsoft Office Software Tutorials Assignment Requirements Your PowerPoint should meet the following requirements: Template: Use the template provided in the resources. Length: A minimum of 9–10 bulleted slides. Notes: You must provide speaker’s notes either in the notes section of your presentation or in a separate Word document that fully explains each slide. Written communication: Written communication must be grammatically correct and free of errors that detract from the overall message. Writing should be consistent with the graduate-level scholarship. APA formatting: Appropriate APA citations and peer-reviewed references on each slide, as well as a reference list slide at the end are necessary. Number of resources: A minimum of five (5) scholarly sources from peer-reviewed journals, textbooks or reputable associations/organizations, such as ACA, ASCA, NIMH, or NIH, published within the past 5–7 years. Distinguished submissions typically exceed this minimum. Competencies Measured By successfully completing this assignment, you will demonstrate your proficiency in the following course competencies and scoring guide criteria: Competency 1: Assess the impact of biopsychosocial characteristics and concerns of diverse populations, both nationally and internationally, on the counseling relationship and process. Describe the counseling practice implications that are key for team members in order to effectively assess and work with individuals and families from a selected population. Competency 2: Explain theories, research, models, and professional ethics related to multicultural counseling, cultural identity development, and social justice advocacy. Describe the characteristics and concerns of an immigrant or refugee population. Identify roles and strategies for a counselor to adopt that could help address the challenges for immigrant families related to acculturation. Explain the challenges and barriers for a selected population with regards to optimal development, mental health and help seeking. Competency 4: Present counseling and advocacy strategies used by counselors to promote social justice for diverse populations at multiple levels. Describe advocacy resources the agency needs to increase the accessibility of services and more effectively serve the population. Competency 5: Communicate in a manner that is scholarly, respectful of the diversity, dignity, and integrity of others and consistent with the codes of ethics guiding members of the counseling profession. Communicate a presentation in a manner that effectively informs the audience on culturally alert practices, is appealing visually, as well as is persuasive and respectful in its message. Textbook Chapter for Assignment 20 Counseling Immigrants and Refugees Chapter Objectives 1. Learn the demographics and characteristics of immigrants and refugees. 2. Identify counseling implications of the information provided for immigrants and refugees. 3. Provide examples of strengths that are associated with immigrants and refugees. 4. Know the special challenges faced by immigrants and refugees. 5. Understand how the implications for clinical practice can guide assessment and therapy with immigrants and refugees. In responding to President Donald Trump’s controversial statements about immigrants from Haiti and African countries, United Nations human rights spokesman Rupert Colville said in a briefing in Geneva “There is no other word one can use but ‘racist.’ You cannot dismiss entire countries and continents as ‘shitholes,’ whose entire populations, who are not white, are therefore not welcome.” (O’Keefe & Gearan, 2018) Jean Yannick Diouf’s story is among the nearly 70 narratives Illinois Senator Dick Durbin collected from dreamers (individuals brought to the U.S. at an early age without documentation). “When Yannick was 8, his father, a diplomat from the African country of Senegal, brought his family to the United States. Unfortunately, Yannick’s parents separated, and Yannick’s father returned to Senegal, leaving Yannick and the rest of the family behind. Yannick didn’t realize it at the time, but when his father left the United States, Yannick lost his legal status to live in this country. Yannick—an honors student and community leader who is currently studying business management at the University of Maryland, College Park—told me that, to him, ‘DACA means dignity. More than making money, having a job gives us dignity and self-respect. I want to work for what I have. I don’t look to anyone for pity. People should judge me based on what I do and what I stand for, not based on status. I want to be given a chance to prove that not only am I a functioning member of society, I am here to serve and share my talents with those in my community’.” (Durbin, 2018) Abrahim Mosavi, a national of Iran and resident of the United States for more than three decades, applied to naturalize in 2000. Although he is eligible to become a citizen, he has waited thirteen years for a final decision on his application. “No one can tell me why I should have to wait so long,” said Mr. Mosavi. (ACLU, 2013) The international-born population in the United States (including undocumented immigrants) was 41.3 million in July 2013; nearly one out of every six adults living in the United States was born abroad (Zeigler & Camarota, 2014). Approximately 12 million are from Mexico, 10.5 million from East and South Asia, 4 million from the Caribbean, 3.2 million from Central America, 3 million from South America, 1.6 million from the Middle East, and about 7.5 million from other countries. Mexican immigrants made up about 28% of all U.S. immigrants, and Asians are currently the fastest-growing group of immigrants in the United States (Pew Research Center, 2014). Immigration from Mexico slowed considerably after the economic downturn in the U.S. economy in 2009; in fact, over 1 million Mexican immigrants have returned to their country of origin since that time. About 11.4 million immigrants are unauthorized, having entered the United States without inspection or overstayed their temporary stay; approximately 60% of undocumented immigrants have been here for more than a decade (Baker & Rytina, 2013). Of the unauthorized immigrants in the United States, an estimated 5,850,000 are from Mexico, 1,700,000 from Central America, 1,400,000 from Asia, 600,000 from Europe and Canada, 550,000 from the Caribbean, 400,000 from the Middle East or Africa, and 190,000 from South America (Pew Research Center, 2014). The reasons for migration include escape from poverty, seeking a higher quality of life, and political unrest (Negy, Schwartz, & Reig-Ferrer, 2009). Many immigrants, particularly those from undeveloped countries and those who are undocumented, earn extremely low wages. Approximately 23% of immigrants and their U.S.-born children live in poverty (Camarota, 2012). About 60% of farm workers, who help pick billions of dollars of agricultural products, are undocumented immigrants. Nearly 25% of workers who butcher meat, poultry, and fish are undocumented, including many women. Most undocumented immigrants subsist on poverty-level wages and are exposed to exploitation and abuse in the workplace. A high percentage of women working in these food industries are subject to sexual abuse (Southern Poverty Law Center, 2010). Since 2012, there has been a surge of unaccompanied immigrant children, primarily from Central American countries such as Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador; many of these children have come to the United States to escape the escalating gang violence in their home countries (young children and teens are forced to join gangs; if they refuse, they and their families are subjected to violent retribution). While border patrol agents can quickly deport children from Mexico, those from Central American countries are given full court proceedings (Lind, 2014). This is creating a backlog of immigration cases. Other countries, such as Mexico, Panama, Nicaragua, and Belize, are also inundated with Central Americans seeking asylum (Restrepo & Garcia, 2014). There is a wide range of educational levels among adult immigrants, with nearly one-third having a college degree (U.S. Census Bureau, 2012). New immigrants are better educated than the U.S. population as a whole: about four out of ten immigrants coming to the United States between 2007 and 2013 had earned at least a bachelor’s degree (Fry, 2015). Immigrants make up nearly 28% of physicians, 31% of computer programmers, and 47% of medical scientists. East Asians and Nigerians are the most highly educated immigrants in U.S. history, with more than 60% having at least a bachelor’s degree (Pew Research Center, 2014; TADIAS, 2014). In contrast, about one-third of U.S. adult immigrants as a whole have not completed high school (compared with 12.5% of the total adult population) (U.S. Census Bureau, 2012). Among the immigrant secondary school population, the high school dropout rate was 21% in 2009—significantly higher than the national average. Although immigrants make up 10% of high school students, they account for 27% of high school dropouts (Child Trends, 2014). In general, children of immigrant families have high rates of poverty (35%) (Wight, Chau, & Aratani, 2011). According to the Department of Homeland Security, only about 39% of undocumented immigrants currently in the United States arrived after the year 2000. Most undocumented immigrants are well integrated into society, and many have children born in the United States—children whose dominant language is English and who have never visited their parents’ homeland. Having established their lives in the United States and having children who only know life in the United States are powerful reasons for these immigrants to want to remain in the country. The work of these undocumented immigrants is indispensable in areas such as agriculture, construction, childcare, and the restaurant and hotel industry (Marrero, 2011). Despite the belief that immigrants are a drain on society, they are no more likely to use social services than are native-born Americans. In fact, the belief that unauthorized immigrants are a financial burden on society ignores the fact that they pay billions of dollars in taxes each year, and nearly half of the adults who have been in the United States for more than 10?years are homeowners (CAP Immigration Team, 2014). Meanwhile, although incidents such as the shooting of a young woman in San Francisco in 2015 by an undocumented Mexican raise fears about crime regarding this population, studies have found that immigrants have a much lower rate of crime and are less likely to be behind bars than are native-born individuals. These findings apply “for both legal immigrants and the unauthorized regardless of their country of origin or level of education” (Ewing, Martínez, & Rumbaut, 2015). Fear regarding immigrants, especially those who are undocumented, may be a product of negative stereotyping or inordinate attention to the criminal acts of a few. CHARACTERISTICS AND STRENGTHS In the following sections we describe the historical, sociopolitical, cultural, and gender characteristics of immigrants, implications for treatment, and the strengths often seen among those who emigrate. Remember that these are generalizations and their applicability needs to be assessed for each client. Historical and Sociopolitical Factors The twin 12-year-old Duarte sisters watched in horror as their parents were accosted and taken away by U.S. Immigration Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents outside of their California home. They were born in the U.S. years after their parents immigrated to the country from Mexico. The sisters and their two older brothers are now trying to piece back together their family and their lives. (Keierleber, 2017) The election of Donald Trump as president of the United States shifted recent immigration policies and public discourse. During the 2016 election season, the Southern Poverty Law Center administered a national survey to approximately 2,000?K–12 teachers. Key findings from the survey include: More than two-thirds of teachers reported that students—mainly immigrants, children of immigrants, and Muslims—had expressed concerns or fears about what might happen to them or their families after the election. More than half had seen an increase in uncivil political discourse. Mo

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