What are the three most important things you learned from the article and how might having this information help students to succeed in college?

Posted: March 17th, 2022

The Assignment What are the three most important things you learned from the article and how might having this information help students to succeed in college? What did you find to be most surprising/shocking from the article and why? Why do you think this article was assigned and how does it relate to the community/college experience? How long did it take you to read the article and prepare your initial post? The Article- THE SEVEN FALSE BELIEFS: ADDRESSING THE PSYCHOSOCIAL UNDERPREPAREDNESS OF THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE STUDENT. Authors: MIRANDA, MICHAEL V. Source: College Student Journal. Winter2014, Vol. 48 Issue 4, p569-577. 9p. Document Type: Article Subjects: COMMUNITY college students PREPAREDNESS CITY University of New York GRADUATE students ACADEMIC degrees NATIONAL Center for Education Statistics PSYCHOLOGY Abstract: Through an analysis of student reactions to several classroom interventions, this article suggests that the single, most important personal characteristic which interferes with the attainment of academic success for the typical community college student is what he or she has already learned about himself or herself and, also, about the process of getting an education. Many students enter the community college with misconceptions about college, about what it will take to earn a college degree, about themselves, and about the world. Unless they discover the truths very early in their college careers, they will begin those careers with such poor results that they will never be able to overcome the difficulties they will have created for themselves in their very first semesters. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of College Student Journal is the property of Project Innovation, Inc. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder’s express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.) Full Text Word Count: 4914 ISSN: 0146-3934 Accession Number: 100358654 Translate Full Text: Choose Language THE SEVEN FALSE BELIEFS: ADDRESSING THE PSYCHOSOCIAL UNDERPREPAREDNESS OF THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE STUDENT This content may contain URLs/links that would redirect you to a non-EBSCO site. EBSCO does not endorse the accuracy or accessibility of these sites, nor of the content therein. ? Contents The Seven False Beliefs Conclusion References Full Text Listen Through an analysis of student reactions to several classroom interventions, this article suggests that the single, most important personal characteristic which interferes with the attainment of academic success for the typical community college student is what he or she has already learned about himself or herself and, also, about the process of getting an education. Many students enter the community college with misconceptions about college, about what it will take to earn a college degree, about themselves, and about the world. Unless they discover the truths very early in their college careers, they will begin those careers with such poor results that they will never be able to overcome the difficulties they will have created for themselves in their very first semesters. The first public community college in the United States was established by the University of Chicago in 1901 when six high school graduates of Joliet Township High School desired to attend college without leaving their local community (Joliet Junior College, n.d.). Given the fact that only eight percent of the nation’s high school students graduated in 1900 (Berger, 2005), there is ample reason to believe that these six Joliet graduates were academically strong and quite motivated to continue their educations. Many of the incoming freshmen at today’s community colleges, however, present very different profiles from the original six as they are likely to have chosen to register at their two-year colleges for reasons of academic, social, and/or economic underpreparedness (Valadez, 1993). While community colleges continue to focus on the goal of providing students the first two years of a baccalaureate education (Eddy, Christie, & Rao, 2006), they are particularly proud of being able to accomplish this with at-risk students (Bulger & Watson, 2006) who may very well be the first in their families to attend college (Greenwald, 2012). We can acknowledge the inherent difficulties in this task of the community colleges by examining the following data: * In all student age groups in the fall of 2011, more students were enrolled in four-year public institutions than were enrolled in two-year public institutions except for the age groups “65 and over” and the one which might be considered the most vulnerable to failure, “under 18” (National Center for Education Statistics, 2012a); * While only 75.5% of public degree-granting four-year institutions had programs which offered remedial services to their students, 99.4% of public degree-granting two-year institutions had such programs in the 2010-2011 academic year (National Center for Education Statistics, 2011a); and * Many public university systems, including the City University of New York (the largest public urban university in the United States) and at least twelve state systems, steer academically underprepared students into the community colleges by refusing admission to any applicant who requires academic remediation (Schemo, 2006). When considering these data, can it be surprising that the national graduation rate for students at public degree-granting two-year institutions for the cohort first entering college in 2007 is only 20.4% (National Center for Education Statistics, 2011b)? This is explained, in part, by the estimate that 80% of all students who graduate in the bottom quarter of their high school classes and then go on to college will never earn a college degree (Steinberg, 2010). But even if this low graduation rate may be understood through some of the academic deficiencies in the students entering public two-year institutions, it is a statistic which pleases no one. Community colleges consistently make efforts to search for programmatic ways to improve the results of the instruction provided to students in their classrooms and to give each and every student, without regard to how underprepared he or she might have been upon entry into their colleges, the opportunity to earn a college education and achieve upward social mobility (Thelin, 2007). The institution of a freshman seminar (Potts & Schultz, 2008), remedial/developmental classes (Gonzalez, 2012b; Hoyt, 1999; Kraska, Nadelman, Maner, & McCormick, 1990), redesigned forms of academic advisement (Bahr, 2008), learning communities (Malnarich, 2005; Mathews, 1993; Raftery, 2005), small group projects (Hennessey & Evans, 2006), more accurate placement exam measurements (Gonzalez, 2012a), and cooperative efforts between secondary schools and the colleges (Kirst, 2008), as well as other approaches, have each been tried. They provide less than completely satisfactory results. In addition, and again with the goal of improving graduation rates, attention has been paid to some individual characteristics of the community college student, including academic disengagement (Berrett, 2012), a failure to identify with academic success (Osborne, 1997), a lack of persistence (Grimes, 1997; Wolfle, 2012), low levels of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation (Liao, Ferdenzi, and Edlin, 2012), difficulties with the English language (Mulready-Shick & Parker, 2013), high degrees of social anxiety (Miranda, 2007), and perceptions of the campus environment as being unpleasant (Edman & Brazil, 2009). However, the suggestion may be made that the single, most important personal characteristic which interferes with the attainment of academic success for the typical community college student is what he or she has already learned about himself or herself and about the process of getting an education. Many students entering the community college arrive with several misconceptions about college, about what it will take to earn a college degree, and, above all, about themselves. Unless they discover the truths very early in their college careers, they will begin those careers with such poor results that they will never be able to overcome the difficulties they will have created for themselves in their very first semesters. They will, instead, have confirmed that a college education is out of reach. Despite all of the efforts made by the college administrations, most of the students who get off to a poor start will not be able to achieve the turnaround they need in time to save themselves and their college careers. In part, this is because the college may not be using its most valuable weapon to guard against students’ failures–the professor in the classroom (Jenkins, 2012; Wyner, 2012). Professors are the individuals on the campus who have the most contact with the students. They also have the potential to be the most influential. This paper will introduce specific techniques, a version of which will be available to every community college professor, which can mean the difference between academic success and failure for a given student. The techniques have the potential to increase the probability of early success experiences for the new community college student–experiences which can have profound and lifelong effects. For many students, the academic underpreparedness with which they arrive on their community college campuses may be matched, or perhaps exceeded, by their psychosocial underpreparedness. This psychosocial underpreparedness, marked by the possession of one or more of the seven false beliefs, is what may be primarily responsible for our students’ failures. The false beliefs were learned and reinforced through the early school and life experiences of the students entering community colleges. The beliefs are based on the thoughts that these students have about a world that is foreign to the one which they and their families occupy. They are also based on the academic attitudes and behaviors instilled in these students in their elemental schools and later reinforced by their high school teachers. As community college professors, we should consider accepting the responsibility for breaking down these barriers to academic success. In the next section, each of the seven false beliefs will be presented. Following an explanation of the origins of the beliefs will be a description of an intervention that has been used to challenge each false belief and then a report of the effectiveness of that intervention gleaned from an end-of-semester survey which was completed by forty-four of the students in my advanced psychology class. Finally, the “new truth” that replaces the false belief will be identified. The Seven False Beliefs False Belief #1 – “As long as I do not exceed the maximum number of absences permitted, I will do just fine and pass the course.” Basis for this False Belief- Many students come out of high school with the understanding that they are permitted to be absent from their classes for a specific number of days without penalty. “How many cuts are we allowed?” is the question they put to their high school teachers and they arrive in their college classrooms with the same question. If students are permitted to be absent four times during a semester without any danger of being dropped from the class, some students immediately plan to take those absences and they expect to do fine. Intervention – On the first day of each semester, my students are given a “Word to the Wise” letter. The letter clearly demonstrates a negative correlation between the number of absences taken and course grades. In the Spring 2013 semester, for example, students in my developmental psychology class read that, over the past ten years, 74% of all students who took no more than one absence during the semester earned either an A or a B, while only 21% of those who took the maximum number of allowable absences received either of those grades. Also, they learned that 53% of the students who took or exceeded the maximum number of allowable absences received an F or were withdrawn from the course, while this was the case for only 1% of students with no more than one absence. Statistics related to False Belief #1 – * 41 of the 44 students (93%) remembered having received this letter. * For 23 of the 41 (56%), the letter made a “significant” impression; * for 40 of the 41 (98%), the letter made either a “significant” impression or “somewhat” of an impression; and * 17 of the 21 students (81%) who had not previously been aware of the importance of having excellent attendance if a high grade was desired indicated that their behaviors and/ or attitudes about their attendance in the class improved as a direct result of the letter. New Truth to Replace False Belief #1 – “If I want a good grade, I must make sure that I am present in class as often as possible. I must not take any unnecessary absences.” False Belief #2 – “Getting a college degree is my ticket to success. The degree is all that matters. Grades really do not count for anything. I just need to finish, get out, and start making money!” Basis for this False Belief- For many students at a community college, the fact is that they are the first in their families to pursue higher education. And they often do not know anyone who is a college graduate personally. The college degree is seen as their ticket to having the kind of life that they have only been able to dream about and they believe that merely possessing the degree is what will change their lives. With this mentality, it is understandable for these students to think that grades do not matter. For them, it is the possession of the degree that gets one where he or she wants to be in life. Interventions – Students need to be informed that, while a college degree is necessary to open the doors which can provide the opportunity to have a significantly better life, there will be a considerable amount of competition in the job market from others with degrees. I display a poster depicting the earth in a photo taken from a location in space as I explain that, when their college careers are over and they go out into the job market to seek out their first professional jobs, their competition will be coming from all over the world. I suggest that they start to think about how they will stand out in the job market. I also suggest that they begin by planning to be remembered as a superior student in my class. Statistics related to False Belief #2 – * 31 of th

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